Build a Digital Manufacturing Platform with the VMware Edge Compute Stack

Build a Digital Manufacturing Platform with the VMware Edge Compute Stack

VMware revealed their edge computing vision at VMworld 2021. In VMware’s view the multi-cloud extends from the public clouds to private clouds to edge. Edge is about bringing apps and services closer to where they are needed, especially in sectors like retail, transportation, energy and manufacturing.

In verticals like manufacturing the edge was always important. It’s about producing things than you can sell. If you cannot produce, you lose time and money. Reliability, stability and factory uptime are not new requirements. But why is edge becoming so important now?

Without looking at any analyst report and only providing experience from the field, it is clear why. Almost all of the large enterprises are migrating workloads from their global (central) data centers to the public cloud. At the same time, customers are looking at new innovations and technologies to connect their machines, processes, people and data in a much more efficient way.

Which requirement did all my customers have in common? They didn’t want to move their dozens or hundreds of edge infrastructures to the public cloud, because the factories should work independently and autonomously in case of a WAN outage for example. Additionally, some VMware technologies were already deployed at the edge.

VMware Edge Compute Stack

This is why VMware introduced the so-called “Edge Compute Stack” (ECS) in October 2021, which is provides a unified platform to run VMs alongside containerized applications at the far edge (aka enterprise edge). ECS is a purpose-built stack that is available in three different editions (information based on initial availability from VMworld 2021):

VMware Edge Comput Stack Editions

As you can see, each VMware Edge Compute Stack edition has the vSphere Enterprise+ (hypervisor) included, software-defined storage with vSAN is optional, but Tanzu for running containers is always included.

While ECS is great, the purpose of this article is about highlighting different solutions and technologies that help you to build the foundation for a digital manufacturing platform.

IT/OT Convergence

You most probably have a mix of home-grown and COTS (commercial off-the-shelf) software, that need to be deployed in your edge locations (e.g., factories, markets, shops etc.). In manufacturing, OT (operational technology) vendors have just started the adoption of container technologies due to unique technology requirements and the business model that relies on proprietary systems.

The OT world is typically very hardware-centric and uses proprietary architectures. These systems and architectures, which were put into production 15-20 years ago, are still functional. It just worked.

While these methods and architectures have been very good, the manufacturing industry realized that this static and inflexible approach resulted in a technology debt, that didn’t allow any innovation for a long period of time.

Manufacturing companies are moving to a cloud-native architecture that should provide more flexibility and vendor interoperability with the same focus in mind: To provide a reliable, scalable and flexible infrastructure.

This is when VMware becomes relevant again with their (edge) compute stack. VMware vSphere allows you to run VMs and containers on the same platform. This is true for IT and OT workloads, that’s IT partial IT/OT covergence.

You may ask yourself how you then would  design the network. I’ll answer this topic in a minute.

Kubernetes Operations

IT platform teams, who design and manage the edge have to expand their (VMware) platform capabilities that allow them to deploy and host containers. Like I said before, this is why Tanzu is included in all the VMware Edge Compute Stack editions. Kubernetes is the new Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) and so it makes only sense that the container deployment and management capability is included.

How do you provide centralized or regional Kubernetes management and operations if you don’t have a global (regional) data center anymore?

With a hybrid approach, by using Tanzu for Kubernetes Operations (TKO), a set of SaaS services that allow you to run, manage, connect and secure your container infrastructure across clouds and edge locations.

IT/OT Security

Now you have the right platform to run your IT and OT workloads on the same hypervisor or compute platform. You also have a SaaS-based control plane to deploy and manage your Kubernetes clusters. 

As soon as you are dealing with a very dynamic environment where containers exist, you are having discussions about software-defined networking or virtualized networks. Apart from that, every organization and manufacturer are transforming their network and security at the edge and talk about network segmentation (and cybersecurity!).

Traditionally, you’ll find the Purdue Model implemented, a concept model for industrial control systems (ICS) that breaks the network in two zones:

  • Information Technology (IT)
  • Operational Technology (OT)

The Purdue Model of Computer Integrated Manufacturing

Source: https://www.automationworld.com/factory/iiot/article/21132891/is-the-purdue-model-still-relevant 

In these IT and OT zones you’ll find subzones that describe different layers and the ICS components. As you can see as well, each level is secured by a dedicated physical firewall appliance. From this drawing one could say that the IT and OT world converge in the DMZ layer, because of the bidirectional traffic flow.

VMware is one of the pioneers when it comes to network segmentation that helps you driving IT/OT convergence. This is made possible by using network virtualization. As soon as you are using the VMware hypervisor and its integrated virtual switch, you are already using a virtualized network.

To bring IT and OT closer together and to provide a virtualized network design based on the Purdue Model including a zero-trust network architecture, you would start looking at VMware NSX to implement that.

In case you are looking for a software-defined load balancer or application delivery controller, have a look at NSX Advanced Load Balancer (formerly known as Avi).

PLC Virtualization

In level 2 of the Purdue Model, which hosts the systems for supervising, monitoring and controlling the physical process, you will find components like human-machine interfaces (HMI) and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) software.

In level 3, manufacturing execution systems (MES) can be found.

Nowadays, most companies already run their HMIs, SCADAs and MES software in virtual machines on the VMware vSphere hypervisor.

The next big thing is the virtualization of PLCs (programmable logic controller), which is an industrial computer that controls manufacturing processes, such as machines, assembly lines and robotic devices. Traditional PLC implementations in hardware are costly and lack scalability.

That is why the company SDA was looking for a less hardware-centric but more software-centric approach and developed the SDA vPLC that is able to meet sub 10ms performance.

This vPLC solution is based on a hybrid architecture between a cloud system and the industrial workload at the edge, which has been tested on VMware’s Edge Compute Stack.

Monitoring & Troubleshooting

One area, which we haven’t highlighted yet, is the monitoring and troubleshooting of virtual machines (VMs). The majority of your workloads are still VM-based. How do you monitor these workloads and applications, deal with resource and capacity planning/management, and troubleshoot, if you don’t have a central data center anymore?

With the same approach as before – just with a cloud-based service. Most organizations rely on vRealize Operations (vROps) and vRealize Log Insight (vRLI) for their IT operations and platform teams gain visibility in all the main and edge data centers.

You can still use vROps and vRLI (on-premises) in your factories, but VMware recommends using the vRealize Cloud Universal (vRCU) SaaS management suite, that gives you the flexibility to deploy your vRealize products on-premises or as SaaS. In an edge use case the SaaS-based control plane just makes sense.

In addition to vRealize Operations Cloud you can make use of the vRealize True Visibility Suite (TVS), that extends your vRealize Operations platform with management packs and connectors to monitor different compute, storage, network, application and database vendors and solutions.

Factory VDI

Some of your factories may need virtual apps or desktops and for edge use cases there are different possible architectures available. Where a factory has a few hundred of concurrent users, a dedicated standalone VDI/RDSH deployment might make sense. What if you have hundreds of smaller factories and don’t want to maintain a complete VDI/RDSH infrastructure?

VMware is currently working on a new architecture for VMware Horizon (aka VMware Horizon Next-Generation) and their goal is to provide a single, unified platform across on-premises and cloud environments.  They also plan to do that by introducing a pod-less architecture that moves key components to the VMware-hosted Horizon (Cloud) Control Plane.

This architecture is perfectly made for edge use cases and with this approach customers can reduce costs, expect increased scalability, improve troubleshooting and provide a seamless experience for any edge or cloud location.

VMware Horizon Next-Generation 

Management for Enterprise Wearables

If your innovation and tech team are exploring new possibilities with wearable technologies like augmented reality (AR), mixed reality (MR) and virtual reality (VR) head-mounted displays (HMDs), then VMware Workspace ONE Unified Endpoint Management (UEM) can help you to securely manage these devices!

Workspace ONE UEM is very strong when it comes to the modern management of Windows Desktop and macOS operating systems, and device management (Android/iOS).

Conclusion

As you can see, VMware has a lot to offer for the enterprise edge. Organizations that are multi-cloud and keep their edge locations on-premises, have a lot of new technologies and possibilities nowadays.

VMware’s strengths are unfolded as soon as you combine different solutions. And these solutions help you to work on your priorities and requirements to build the right foundation for a digital manufacturing platform.

VMware Cloud on AWS – The Power of VMware and AWS

VMware Cloud on AWS – The Power of VMware and AWS

VMware Cloud on AWS (VMC on AWS) brings VMware’s software-defined data center (SDDC) stack to the AWS cloud. By using the same vSphere-based virtualization/cloud technology on-premises and in the public cloud, you can create a true hybrid cloud architecture, that enables you to get consistent operations by using consistent infrastructure.

VMC on AWS Overview

This solution comes with optimized access to the AWS services and is delivered, sold and supported by VMware, AWS and their partner networks.

As you can see above, VMC on AWS comes with the same VMware tools and integrates the VMware Cloud Foundation stack (vSphere for compute, vSAN for storage, NSX for networking) along with vCenter for management.

VMware Cloud on AWS runs on dedicated Amazon EC2 bare-metal infrastructure.

Instance Types

VMware Cloud on AWS comes with two different host configurations, which both require a minimum of two hosts per cluster.

VMC on AWS Instances

For identifying the right host types for specific use cases, check out the VMware Cloud on AWS sizer.

Note: 99.9% SLA for non-stretched clusters, 99.99% for stretched clusters

Single Host Starter Configuration

VMC on AWS allows you to deploy a starter configuration with a single host only (not available with i3en.metal hosts).

This small SDDC configuration allows customers to get their first experiences with this hybrid cloud offering during a 60-day time period. Such a setup is only appropriate for test and development or proof of concept use cases. You can run production workloads on this small VMC on AWS environment if you scale up to the minimum of two hosts before the 60-day period ends, otherwise your evaluation ends with you losing data.

Note: Not all features of the standard VMC service offering are available in this limited setting. The VMC on AWS service level offering also does not apply to this one-node offering.

Included VMware Software

The following software is included in single host and production configurations:

Single Hosts (non-production environments) Production (minimum 2 hosts)

Includes

  • VMware SDDC software: vSphere, vSAN, NSX-T, vCenter Server
  • VMware HCX
  • Dedicated Amazon EC2 Bare Metal Instances
  • VMware Global Support

Purchase separately

  • VMware Site Recovery
  • VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery
  • VMware vRealize Automation Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Operations Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Log Insight Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Network Insight Cloud
  • VMware Tanzu Standard

Not supported

  • Lifecycle management by VMware (updates, patches and upgrades)
  • High Availability (HA) and Stretched Clusters
  • Service Level Agreement (SLA)

Includes

  • VMware SDDC software: vSphere, vSAN, NSX-T, vCenter Server
  • VMware HCX
  • VMware Tanzu Services: TKG Service + TMC Essentials
  • Dedicated Amazon EC2 Bare Metal Instances
  • VMware Global Support
  • Lifecycle management by VMware (updates, patches and upgrades)
  • Support for High Availability (HA) and Stretched Clusters
  • Service Level Agreement (SLA)

Purchase separately

  • VMware Site Recovery
  • VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery
  • VMware NSX Advanced Firewall
  • VMware vRealize Automation Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Operations Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Log Insight Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Network Insight Cloud
  • VMware Tanzu Standard

VMware Cloud on AWS Outposts

If you want to get the agility and innovation of (VMware) Cloud in your own data center, delivered as a service, then VMC on AWS Outposts is for you.

VMC on AWS Outposts is a fully managed on-premises as-a-service offering, that stretches VMC on AWS to your data center or edge location. You’ll get dedicated Amazon Nitro-based EC2 bare-metal instances delivered on-premises with VMware Cloud Foundation running on top.

VMC on AWS Outposts

What’s included in the offering?

  • AWS Outposts 42u rack (we can also expect a half-rack offering in the future)
    • 3-8 hosts configurations based on i3en.metal
    • Dark host capacity included (for remediation, EDRS, scale-out and lifecycle management purposes)
    • Installed by AWS
  • AWS managed dedicated Nitro-based i3en.metal EC2 instance with local SSD storage
  • VMware managed SDDC software – vSphere, vSAN, NSX-T, vCenter Server
  • VMware HCX
  • VMware Cloud Console
  • Support by VMware SREs
  • Supply chain, shipment logistics and onsite installation by AWS
  • Ongoing hardware monitoring with break/fix support.

Use Cases

VMware Cloud on AWS Outposts is made for multiple use cases:

  • Data/App Locality
  • Low latency
  • Local data processing
  • Data sovereignty/compliance
  • Infrastructure modernization
  • Branche Office or large edge modernization

But this offering and VMC on AWS in general come with multiple other use cases which help orgnaizations to fulfill their cloud strategy.

App Modernization

VMware Cloud on AWS provides an infrastructure platform option for customers to modernize their existing enterprise applications on and enables them to run their enterprise workloads of today and tomorrow. With VMware Cloud on AWS, customers can run, monitor, and manage their Kubernetes clusters and virtual machines – all on the same infrastructure. VMware Tanzu Kubernetes Grid provides a consistent, upstream-compatible distribution of Kubernetes, that is tested, signed, and supported by VMware. Tanzu Kubernetes Grid is central to many of the offerings in the VMware Tanzu portfolio.

Solution Brief

Cloud Migration / Data Center Extension

VMC on AWS can help customers to expand to new locations. Maybe it’s an unplanned project or there are temporary or seasonal capacity needs. Some customers are also using such an offering to build a flexible test, lab or training environment in the public cloud.

Solution Brief

Cloud VDI

Adopt a robust, feature-rich cloud platform for virtual desktops and applications that can be used to deliver complete VDI infrastructure from the cloud. Or you can extend an existing on-premises VDI environment for desktop bursting, protection or proximity to applications running in AWS. Optimize infrastructure costs with flexible, consumption-based billing while paying only for what you use.

Solution Brief

Disaster Recovery

Another typical use case is disaster recovery. Customers are looking for an offsite approach with which they can prepare themselves for different kind of scenarios with “warm standby” or “active/active” configurations. There are different architectural options and also different solutions from VMware available, e.g.:

Hybrid Cloud Extension (HCX)

How can you bridge the gap between on-premises data centers and VMC on AWS to enable application migrations or workload mobility? HCX creates an encrypted, high-throughput, WAN-optimized, load-balanced, traffic-engineered hybrid interconnect automates the creation of network extensions.

In short: VMware HCX can interconnect different vSphere-based clouds and with that you achieve a fabric for workload mobility by using vMotion over different clouds. It even preserves existing network connections!

Imagine how much easier and faster application migrations can be done now.

Let’s see if there is a future, that customers need full workload mobility where regular migrations from and to different clouds can be done. Maybe there is a customer, who migrates workloads today from on-prem to VMC on AWS, tomorrow to Azure VMware Solution, the next week to Google Cloud VMware Engine, and in the end back to an on-premises data center where another fully managed service like VMC on Dell EMC is deployed. 😀

VMware Cloud on AWS with Tanzu Services

It was mentioned above already, VMware Cloud on AWS includes “Tanzu Kubernetes Service” and “Tanzu Mission Control Essentials”.

VMware Cloud with Tanzu Services has been introduced at VMworld 2021 as the “Easy path to enterprise-grade Kubernetes on a fully managed, multi-cloud ready IaaS and CaaS platform”:

VMware Cloud with Tanzu Services

 

This was also when Tanzu Services became available for VMC on AWS with the following capabilities:

  • Managed Tanzu Kubernetes Grid Service: Provision Tanzu Kubernetes clusters within a few minutes using a simple, fast, and self-service experience in the VMware Cloud console. The underlying SDDC infrastructure and capacity required for Kubernetes workloads is fully managed by VMware. Use vCenter Server for managing Kubernetes workloads by deploying Kubernetes clusters, provisioning role-based access and allocating capacity for Developer teams. Manage multiple TKG clusters as namespaces with observability, troubleshooting and resiliency in vCenter Server.
  • Built in support for Tanzu Mission Control Essentials: Attach upstream compliant Kubernetes clusters including Amazon EKS and Tanzu Kubernetes Grid clusters. Manage lifecycle for Tanzu Kubernetes Grid clusters and centralize platform operations for Kubernetes clusters using the Kubernetes management plane offered by Tanzu Mission Control. Tanzu Mission Control provides a global visibility across clusters and clouds and increases security and governance by automating operational tasks such as access and security management at scale.

VMware Cloud with Tanzu Services

Take a look at the VMware Tanzu Mission Control Feature Comparison Chart to better understand the feature set of TMC Essentials.

Did you know that the Tanzu Mission Control Standard Package is included with TMC Essentials?

As of November 2021, new clusters registered with TMC will have the Carvel package manager (the kapp-controller), deployed within the cluster. The “Catalog” page in the Tanzu Mission Control console allows you to view packages available from the Tanzu Standard repository (and your own custom Carvel package repositories) and install them in your Kubernetes clusters.

Tanzu Mission Control Packages

Application Transformer for VMware Tanzu for VMC on AWS

VMware announced the tech preview for Application Transformer for VMware Tanzu for VMware Cloud on AWS in September 2021.

Application Transformer for VMware Tanzu is a tool that aids organizations in discovering application types, visualizing application topology, choosing a modernization approach based on scores, and containerizing and migrating suitable legacy applications to enhance business outcomes. As an agentless tool, Application Transformer for Tanzu utilizes the VMware vCenter API to introspect VMs across an entire vSphere or VMware Cloud on AWS-based data center.

Application Transformer can help you to convert virtual machines and application components to OCI-compliant container images, that then can be deployed into the Tanzu Kubernetes stack.

There are several ways how customers get access to Application Transformer for VMware Tanzu:

Good news for everyone is that Application Transformer for VMware Tanzu became generally available in February 2022. With this, VMware Cloud on AWS customers also have limited access to this offering from now on. The access is through integration with VMware Cloud console. If customers desire full access to Application Transformer, they need to buy Tanzu Standard, Tanzu Advanced, Tanzu for Kubernetes Operations, or App Navigator.

Features & Roadmap

VMware provides a lot of information about the features and roadmap of VMware Cloud on AWS.

VMC on AWS FAQ

There is a large collection of FAQs available than can be found here.

VMware Cloud Foundation – A Technical Overview

VMware Cloud Foundation – A Technical Overview

While I was studying for the VMware Cloud Foundation Specialist certification, I realized that there is no one-pager available that gives you a short technical explanation of VMware Cloud Foundation.

What is VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF)?

VMware Cloud Foundation is a hybrid cloud platform that provides a full-stack hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) that is made for modernizing data centers and deploying modern container-based applications. VCF integrates different components like vSphere (compute), vSAN (storage), NSX (networking) and some parts of the vRealize Suite in a HCI solution with infrastructure automation and software lifecycle management. The idea of VCF follows a standardized, automated and validated approach that simplifies the management of all the needed software-defined infrastructure resources.

This standardized and automated software stack provides customers consistent infrastructure and operations in a cloud operating model that can be deployed on-premises, at the edge or public cloud.

Cloud Foundation has Tanzu Standard integrated to provide a unified platform that lets virtual machines (VMs), Kubernetes and containers co-exist on the same platform.

Note: The Tanzu Standard Edition is included in the VCF Standard, Advanced and Enterprise edition

What software is being delivered in Cloud Foundation?

The BoM (bill of materials) is changing with each VCF release. Let me take the VCF 4.3 release as example to list the components and software versions:

  • VMware SDDC Manager 4.3
  • vSphere 7.0 Update 2a with Tanzu
  • vCenter Server 7.0 P03
  • vSAN 7.0 Update 2
  • NSX-T 3.1.3
  • VMware Workspace ONE Access 3.3.5
  • vRealize Log Insight 8.4
  • vRealize Operations 8.4
  • vRealize Automation 8.4.1
  • (vRealize Network Insight)

Note: VCF 4.3 deploys vRealize Lifecycle Manager (VRSLCM) 8.4.1, which then deploys and provides ongoing lifecycle management for other vRealize components. Currently, vRealize Network Insight needs to be imported manually into VRSLCM and then deployed.

Which VMware Cloud Foundation editions are available?

A VCF comparison matrix can be found here.

VMware Cloud Foundation Editions

VMware Cloud Foundation Architecture

VCF is made for greenfield deployments (brownfield not supported) and supports two different architecture models:

  • Standard Architecture
  • Consolidated Architecture

VMware Cloud Foundation Architecture

The standard architecture separates management workloads and lets them run on a dedicated management workload domain. Customer workloads are deployed on a separate virtual infrastructure workload domain (VI workload domain). Each workload domain is managed by a separate vCenter Server instance, which allows autonomous licensing and lifecycle management.

                                                 

Note: The standard architecture is the recommended model, because it separates management workloads from customers workloads.

Customers with a small environment (or a PoC) can start with a consolidated architecture. This allows you to run customer and management workloads together on the same workload domain (WLD).

Note: The management workload domain’s default cluster datastore must use vSAN. Other WLDs can use vSAN, NFS, FC and vVols for the principal storage.

VMware Cloud Foundation Storage

Does VCF provide flexible workload domain sizing?

Yes, that’s possible. You can license the WLDs based on your needs and use the editions that make the most sense depending on your use cases.

VMware Cloud Foundation Flexible Licensing

How many physical nodes are required to deploy VMware Cloud Foundation?

A minimum of four physical nodes is required to start in a consolidated architecture or to build your management workload domain. Four nodes are required to ensure that the environment can tolerate a failure while another node is being updated.

VI workload domains require a minimum of three nodes.

This means, to start with a standard architecture, you need to have the requirements (and money) to start with at least seven physical nodes.

What are the minimum hardware requirements?

These minimum specs have been listed for the management WLD since VCF 4.0 (September 2020):

VMware Cloud Foundation Hardware Requirements

What about edge/remote use cases?

When you would like to deploy VMware Cloud Foundation workload domains at a remote site, you can deploy so-called “VCF Remote Clusters”. Those remote workload domains are managed by the VCF instance at the central site and you can perform the same full-stack lifecycle management for the remote sites from the central SDDC Manager.

Prerequisites to deploy remote clusters can be found here.

Does VCF support HCI Mesh?

Yes. VMware Cloud Foundation 4.2 and later supports sharing remote datastores with HCI Mesh for VI workload domains.

HCI Mesh is a software-based approach for disaggregation of compute and storage resources in vSAN. HCI Mesh brings together multiple independent vSAN clusters by enabling cross-cluster utilization of remote datastore capacity within vCenter Server. HCI Mesh enables you to efficiently utilize and consume data center resources, which provides simple storage management at scale.

What is SDDC Manager?

SDDC Manager is a preconfigured virtual appliance that is deployed in the management workload domain for creating workload domains, provisioning additional virtual infrastructure and lifecycle management of all the software-defined data center (SDDC) management components.

You use SDDC Manager in VMware Cloud Foundation to perform the following operations:

  • Commissioning or decommissioning ESXi hosts
  • Deployment of workload domains
  • Extension of clusters in the management and workload domains with ESXi hosts
  • Adding clusters to the management domain and workload domains
  • Support for network pools for host configuration in a workload domain
  • Product licenses storage
  • Deployment of vRealize Suite components.
  • Lifecycle management of the virtual infrastructure components in all workload domains, and of vRealize Suite Lifecycle Manager components.
  • Certificate management
  • Password management and rotation
  • NSX-T Edge cluster deployment in the management domain and workload domains
  • Backup configuration

VMware Cloud Foundation SDDC Manager Dashboard

How many resources does the VCF management WLD need during the bring-up process?

We know that VCF includes vSphere (ESXi and vCenter), vSAN, SDDC Manager, NSX-T and eventually some components of the vRealize Suite. The following table should give you an idea how the resource requirements look like to get VCF up and running:

VMware Cloud Foundation Resource Requirements

If you are interested to know how many resources the vRealize Suite will consume of the management workload domain , have a look at this table:

VMware Cloud Foundation Resource Requirements vRealize

How can I migrate my workloads from a non-VCF environment to a new VCF deployment?

VMware HCX provides a path to modernize from a legacy data center architecture by migrating to VMware Cloud Foundation.

VMware Cloud Foundation HCX Migration

Where can I get more information about VMware Tanzu and the Tanzu Standard edition?

Please have a look at these articles:

What is NSX Advanced Load Balancer?

NSX Advanced Load Balancer (NSX ALB) formerly known as Avi is a solution that provides advanced load balancing capabilities for VMware Cloud Foundation. 

Which security add-ons are available with VMware Cloud Foundation?

VMware has different workload and network security offerings to complement VCF:

Is there also a VCF subscription license?

Yes, you can purchase VCF-S (VCF Subscription) licenses as part of the VMware Cloud Universal program.

Can I get VCF as a managed service offering?

Yes, this is possible. Please have a look at Data Center as a Service based on VMware Cloud Foundation.

Where can I get more information?

Please consult the VMware Foundation 4.3 FAQ for more information about VMware Cloud Foundation. 

 

A Universal License and Technology to Build a Flexible Multi-Cloud

A Universal License and Technology to Build a Flexible Multi-Cloud

In November 2020 I wrote an article called “VMware Cloud Foundation And The Cloud Management Platform Simply Explained“. That piece was focused on the “why” and “when” VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) makes sense for your organization. It also includes business values and hints that VCF is more than just about technology. Cloud Foundation is one of the most important drivers and THE enabler for to fulfill VMware’s multi-cloud strategy.

If you are not familiar enough with VMware’s multi-cloud strategy, then please have a look at my article “VMware Multi-Cloud and Hyperscale Computing” first.

To summarize the two above mentioned articles, one can say, that VMware Cloud Foundation is a software-defined data center (SDDC) that can run in any cloud. In “any cloud” means that VCF can also be consumed as a service through other cloud provider partners like:

Additionally, Cloud Foundation and the whole SDDC can be consumed as a managed offering called DCaaS or LCaaS (Data Center / Local Cloud as a service).

Let’s say a customer is convinced that a “VCF everywhere” approach is right for them and starts building up private and public clouds based on VMware’s technologies. This means that VMware Cloud Foundation now runs in their private and public cloud.

Note: This doesn’t mean that the customer cannot use native public cloud workloads and services anymore. They can simply co-exist.

The customer is at a point now where they have achieved a consistent infrastructure. What’s up next? The next logical step is to use the same automation, management and security consoles to achieve consistent operations.

A traditional VMware customer goes for the vRealize Suite now, because they would need vRealize Automation (vRA) for automation and vRealize Operations (vROps) to monitor the infrastructure.

The next topic in this customer’s journey would be application modernization, which includes topics containerization and Kubernetes. VMware’s answer for this is the Tanzu portfolio. For the sake of this example let’s go with “Tanzu Standard”, which is one of four editions available in the Tanzu portfolio (aka VMware Tanzu).

VMware Cloud Foundation

Let’s have a look at the customer’s bill of materials so far:

  • VMware Cloud Foundation on-premises (vSphere, vSAN, NSX)
  • VMware Cloud on AWS)
  • VMware Cloud on Dell EMC (locally managed VCF service for special edge use cases)
  • vRealize Automation
  • vRealize Operations
  • Tanzu Standard (includes Tanzu Kubernetes Grid and Tanzu Mission Control)

Looking at this list above, we see that their infrastructure is equipped with three different VMware Cloud Foundation flavours (on-prem, hyperscaler managed, locally managed) complemented by products of the vRealize Suite and the Tanzu portfolio.

This infrastructure with its different technologies, components and licenses has been built up over the past few years. But organizations are nowadays asking for more flexibility than ever. By flexibility I mean license portability and a subscription model.

VMware Cloud Universal

On 31st March 2021 VMware introduced VMware Cloud Universal (VMCU). VMCU is the answer to make the customer’s life easier, because it gives you the choice and flexibility in which clouds you want to run your infrastructure and consume VMware Cloud offerings as needed. It even allows you to convert existing on-premises VCF licenses to a VCF-subscription license.

The VMCU program includes the following technologies and licenses:

  • VMware Cloud Foundation Subscription
  • VMware Cloud on AWS
  • Google Cloud VMware Engine
  • VMware Cloud on Dell EMC
  • vRealize Cloud Universal Enterprise Plus
  • Tanzu Standard Edition
  • VMware Success 360 (S360 is required with VMCU)

VMware Cloud Console

As Kit Kolbert, CTO VMware, said, “the idea is that VMware Cloud is everywhere that you want your applications to be”.

The VMware Cloud Console gives you view into all those different locations. You can quickly see what’s going on with a specific site or cloud landing zone, what its overall utilization looks like or if issues occur.

The Cloud Console has a seamless integration with vROps, which also helps you regarding capacity forecasting and (future) requirements (e.g., do I have enough capacity to meet my future demand?).

VMware Cloud Console

In short, it’s the central multi-cloud console to manage your global VMware Cloud environment.

vRealize Cloud Universal

What is part of vRealize Cloud Universal (vRCU) Enterprise Plus? vRCU is a SaaS management suite that combines on-premises and SaaS capabilities for automation, operations, log analytics and network visibility into a single offering. In other words, you get to decide where you want to deploy your management and operations tools. vRealize Cloud Universal comes in four editions and in VMCU you have the vRCU Enterprise Plus edition included with the following components:

vRealize Cloud Universal Editions

    Note: While vRCU standard, advanced and enterprise are sold as standalone editions today, the enterprise plus edition is only sold with VMCU (and as add-on to VMC on AWS).

    vRealize AI Cloud

    Have you ever heard of Project Magna? It is something that was announced at VMworld 2019, that provides adaptive optimization and a self-tuning engine for your data center. It was Pat Gelsinger who envisioned a so-called “self-driving data center”. Intelligence-driven data center might haven been a better term since Project Magna leverages artificial intelligence by using reinforcement learning, which combs through your data and runs thousands of scenarios that searches for the best regard output based on trial and error on the Magna SaaS analytics engine.

    The first instantiation began with vSAN (today also known as vRAI Cloud vSAN Optimizer), where Magna will collect data, learn from it, and make decisions that will automatically self-tune your infrastructure to drive greater performance and efficiencies.

    Today, this SaaS service is called vRealize AI Cloud.

    vRealize AI Cloud vSAN vRealize AI (vRAI) learns about your operating environments, application demands and adapts to changing dynamics, ensuring optimization per stated KPI. vRAI Cloud is only available on vRealize Operations Cloud via the vRealize Cloud Universal subscription.

    VMware Skyline

    VMware Skyline as a support service that automatically collects, aggregates, and analyzes product usage data, which proactively identifies potential problems and helps the VMware support engineers to improve the resolution time. Skyline is included in vRealize Cloud Universal because it just makes sense. A lot of customers have asked for unifying the self-service experience between Skyline and vRealize Operations Cloud. And many customers are using Skyline and vROps side by side today.

    Users can now be proactive and perform troubleshooting in a single SaaS workflow. This means customers save more time by automating Skyline proactive remediations in vROps Cloud. But Skyline supports vSphere, vSAN, NSX, vRA, VCF and VMware Horizon as well.

    VMware Cloud Universal Use Cases

    As already mentioned, VMCU makes very much sense if you are building a hybrid or multi-cloud architecture with a consistent (VMware) infrastructure. VMCU, vRCU and the Tanzu portfolio help you to create a unified control plane for your cloud infrastructure.

    Other use cases could be cloud migration or cloud bursting scenarios. If we switch back to the fictive customer before, we could use VMCU to convert existing VCF licenses to VCF-S (subscription) licenses, which in the end allow you to build a VMware-based Cloud on top of AWS (other public cloud providers are coming very soon!) for example.

    Another good example is to achieve the same service and operating model on-prem as in the public cloud: a fully managed consumable infrastructure. Meaning, to move from a self-built and self-managed VCF infrastructure to something like VMC on Dell EMC.

    How can I get VMCU?

    There is no monthly subscription model and VMware only supports one-year or three-year terms. Customers will need to sign an Enterprise License Agreement (ELA) and purchase VMCU SPP credits.

    Note: SPP credits purchased out of the program are not allowed to be used within the VMCU program!

    After purchasing the VMCU SPP credits and VMware Cloud onboarding and organization setup, you can select the infrastructure offerings to consume your SPP credits. This can be done via the VMware Cloud Console.

    Summary

    I hope this article was useful to get a better understanding about VMware Cloud Universal. It might seem a little bit complex, but that’s not true. VMCU makes your life easier and helps you to build and license a globally distributed cloud infrastructure based on VMware technology.

    VCF Subscription

     

     

     

    VMworld 2021 – My Content Catalog and Session Recommendation

    VMworld 2021 – My Content Catalog and Session Recommendation

    VMworld 2021 is going to happen from October 6-7, 2021 (EMEA). This year you can expect so many sessions and presentations about the options you have when combining different products together, that help you to reduce complexity, provide more automation and therefore create less overhead.

    Let me share my 5 personal favorite picks and also 5 recommended sessions based on the conversations I had with multiple customers this year.

    My 5 Personal Picks

    10 Things You Need to Know About Project Monterey [MCL1833]

    Project Monterey was announced in the VMworld 2020 keynote. There has been tremendous work done since then. Hear Niels Hagoort and Sudhansu Jain talking about SmartNICs and how they will redefine the data center with decoupled control and data planes – for ESXi hosts and bare-metal systems. They are going to cover and demo the overall architecture and use cases!

    Upskill Your Workforce with Augmented and Virtual Reality and VMware [VI1596]

    Learn from Matt Coppinger how augmented realited (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are transforming employee productivity, and how these solutions can be deployed and managed using VMware technologies. Matt is going to cover the top enterprise use cases for AR/VR as well as the challenges you might face deploying these emerging technologies. Are you interested how to architect and configure VMware technologies to deploy and manage the latest AR/VR technology, applications and content? If yes, then this session is also for you.

    Addressing Malware and Advanced Threats in the Network [SEC2027] (Tech+ Pass Only)

    I am very interested to learn more cybersecurity. With Chad Skipper VMware has an expert who can give insights on how the Network Detection and Response (NDR) capabilities if NSX Advanced Threat Prevention provide visibility, detection and prevention of advanced threats.

    60 Minutes of Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) 3rd Edition [MCL1853]

    Learn more about NUMA from Frank Denneman. You are going to learn more about the underlying configuration of a virtual machine and discover the connection between the Generapl-Purpose Graphics Processing Unit (GPGPU) and the NUMA node. You will also understand after how your knowledge of NUMA concepts in your cluster can help the developer by aligning the Kubernetes nodes to the physical infrastructure with the help of VM Service.

    Mount a Robust Defense in Depth Strategy Against Ransomware [SEC1287]

    Are you interested to learn more about how to protect, detect, respond to and recover from cybersecurity attacks across all technology stacks, regardless of their purpose or location? Learn more from Amanda Blevins about the VMware solutions for end users, private clouds, public clouds and modern applications.

    5 Recommended Sessions based on Customer Conversations

    Cryptographic Agility: Preparing for Quantum Safety and Future Transition [VI1505]

    A lot of work is needed to better understand cryptographic agility and how we can address and manage the expected challenges that come with quantum computing. Hear VMware’s engineers from the Advanced Technology Group talking about the requirements of crypto agility and VMware’s recent research work on post-quantum cryptography in the VMware Unified Access Gateway (UAG) project.

    Edge Computing in the VMware Office of the CTO: Innovations on the Horizon [VI2484]

    Let Chris Wolf give you some insight into VMware’s strategic direction in support of edge computing. He is going to talk about solutions that will drive down costs while accelerating the velocity and agility in which new apps and services can be delivered to the edge.

    Delivering a Continuous Stream of More Secure Containers on Kubernetes [APP2574]

    In this session one can see how you can use two capabilities in VMware Tanzu Advanced, Tanzu Build Service and Tanzu Application Catalog, to feed a continuous stream of patched and compliant containers into your continuous delivery (CD) system. A must attend session delivered by David Zendzian, the VMware Tanzu Global Field CISO.

    A Modern Firewall For any Cloud and any Workload [SEC2688]

    VMware NSX firewall reimagines East-West security by using a distributed- and software-based approach to attach security policies to every workload in any cloud. Chris Kruegel gives you insights on how to stop lateral movement with advanced threat prevention (ATP) capabilities via IDS/IPS, sandboxing, NTA and NDR.

    A Practical Approach for End-to-End Zero Trust [SEC2733]

    Hear different the VMware CTOs Shawn Bass, Pere Monclus and Scott Lundgren talking about a zero trust approach. Shawn and the others will discuss specific capabilities that will enable customers to achieve a zero trust architecture that is aligned to the NIST guidance and covers secure access for users as well secure access to workloads.

    Enjoy VMworld 2021! 🙂

     

    VMware is Becoming a Leading Cybersecurity Vendor

    VMware is Becoming a Leading Cybersecurity Vendor

    For most organizations it is still new that they can talk about cybersecurity with VMware. VMware’s intrinsic security vision is something we have seen the first time at VMworld 2019, and since then it has become more a strategy than a vision.

    VMware is not new to enterprise security and it didn’t start with Workspace ONE nor with NSX. Security was already part of their DNA since it was possible for the first time that two virtual machines can share a physical host and have isolated compute resources assigned.

    Another example of (intrinsic) security came with vSAN and the encryption of data at rest, then followed by unified endpoint management and identity/access management with Workspace ONE. But wait!

    It was August 2013 when Pat Gelsinger introduced NSX as the platform for network virtualization, which included the distributed firewall capability already. The internal firewall is built into the VMware hypervisor since almost 8 years now, wow!

    NSX Service-Defined Firewall

    I had no customer so far, who wasn’t talking about achieving zero trust security with micro-segmentation to prevent lateral (east-west) movement. Zero trust is one approach to improve data center defenses with the inspection of every traffic flow within the data center. The idea is to divide the data center infrastructure into smaller security zones and that the traffic between the zones is inspected based on the organization’s defined policies.

    Perimeter Defense vs Micro-Segmentation

    Micro-segmentation puts a firewall to each virtual machine or workload, allowing us to protect all east-west communication.

    So, deploy micro-segmentation and the problem is solved, right? Not quite. While the concept of micro-segmentation has been around for a while, organizations still face barriers when trying to apply it in practice.

    Let’s have a look at some of the barriers to micro-segmentation and why this solution alone is not enough (anymore) to achieve zero trust:

    • Policy discovery challenges – Identifying the right micro-segments and configuring the proper security policies is an extremely daunting task, especially in a dynamic data center environment.
    • Limited-access controls – Basing micro-segmentation solely on L4 attributes (e.g., IP addresses and ports) is not enough. The ephemeral nature of applications and flows requires more than that.
    • Reliance on agents – Some micro-segmentation implementations require the installation of extra software agents on each virtual machine (VM), causing complexity and introducing vulnerability.
    • Lack of threat detection and prevention – Threats often masquerade as normal-looking traffic. Settling for basic traffic blocking rules isn’t enough.

    What does that tell us? Understanding the current applications’ topology and communication flows between their sub-services and -components is not easy. And with applications, which become less monolithic but very dynamic and distributed across multiple clouds, it becomes almost impossible, right?

    NSX Intelligence is a home-grown solution that automates policy discovery, understands the communication between services and can construct apps and flows maps (topologies).

    NSX Intelligence Recommendations

    Can we assume that traffic from A to B over HTTPS is safe per se with micro-segmentation? Nope.

    If we want to enhance traffic analysis capabilities and have a deeper look into traffic, the L7 (application layer) capabilities for micro-segmentation can be used.

    Firewall rules cannot consume application IDs. A context-aware firewall identifies applications and enforces a micro-segmentation for east-west traffic, independent of the port that the application uses.

    Other use case: For virtual desktop infrastructures (VDI), you could use VMware NSX’s ability to provide Active Directory identity-based firewall (IDFW) rules.

    Okay. We have a topology now and can create context-aware service-defined firewall rules. How can we differentiate between good or bad traffic? How can we detect network anomalies?

    Today’s attacks are becoming more sophisticated and hackers use masquerading techniques to embed threats within normal-looking traffic flows. Micro-segmentation alone will not intercept hidden threats, it only identifies traffic flows that should be allowed or blocked.

    It’s time to talk about advanced inspection capabilities.

    NSX Distributed IDS/IPS

    In general, for a firewall to inspect traffic, the traffic has to pass through it. In a virtual world this means we would redirect traffic from the VM’s to the firewalls and back. A practice called hair-pinning:

    Firewall Hair-Pinning

    That results in additional traffic and unnecessary latency. NSX has a distributed architecture, there is no centralized appliance that limits security capacity and network traffic doesn’t need to be hair-pinned to a network security stack for traffic inspection. Everything done with physical appliance can now be done in software (see coloring).

    Software-Defined Networking without Hair-Pinning

    The term intrinsic security always means that security is built into the infrastructure. The micro-segmentation capabilities including NSX Intelligence come without an agent – no reliance on agents!

    The VMware NSX Distributed IDS/IPS functionality adds additional traffic inspection capabilities to the service-defined firewall and follows the same intrinsic security principles.

    Note: These regular-expression IDS/IPS engines detect traffic patterns and are programmed to look for malicious traffic patterns.

    NSX Distributed IDPS

    NSX Advanced Threat Prevention (ATP)

    At VMworld 2020 VMware announced NSX Advanced Threat Protection, that brings technology from their Lastline acquisition to the NSX service-defined firewall.

    In my understanding, Lastline’s core product was a malware sandbox that can go deeper (than other sandboxes from other vendors) by using a full-system emulation to look at every instruction the malware executes.

    The Lastline system uses machine learning that recognizes essential elements of an attack, unlike the narrow signature-based systems that miss the many variants an attacker may use. The Lastline approach is not just anomaly detection – anomaly detection treats every outlier as bad and results in many false positives. Lastline leverages the deep understanding of malicious behavior to flag clearly bad activities such as East-West movement, command and control activity, and data exfiltration.

    This brings us to the powerful combination of the existing VMware capabilities with recently integrated Lastline feature set:

    NSX FW with ATP Features

    NSX Network Detection and Response

    Network Detection and Response (NDR) is a category of security solutions that complement EDR (we talk about Endpoint Detection and Response later) tools.

    Powered by artificial intelligence (AI), NSX NDR maps and defends against MITRE ATT&CK techniques with the current capabilities:

    NSX NDR MITRE ATTACK Framework Capabilities Q2 2021

    NSX NDR protects the network, cloud and hybrid cloud traffic, and provides a cloud-based and on-prem architecture that enables sensors to gain comprehensive visibility into traffic that crosses the network perimeter (north/south), as well as traffic that moves laterally inside the perimeter (east/west).

    NSX NDR uses a combination of four complementary technologies to detect and analyze advanced threats:

    NSX NDR Technologies

    Behavior-based Network Traffic Analysis (NTA)

    Network Traffic Analysis tools are all about detecting anomalies within the network (on-prem and public cloud) and use AI to create models of normal network activity and then alert on anomalies.

    VMware NTA Anomalies

    The challenge today is that not all anomalies are malicious. With Lastline’s NTA, VMware can now pick up threat behaviors and correlate these to network anomalies and vice versa. Because of this, according to VMware, they have the industry’s most accurate threat detection with minimal false positives.

    NSX NDR NTA Anomaly 2

    Intrusion Detection and Prevention System (IDPS)

    The NSX Advanced Threat Protection bundle includes IDS/IPS, which is integrated into NSX. The NSX Distributed IDS/IPS benefits from the unique application context from the hypervisor and network virtualization layers to make threat detection more accurate, efficient and dynamic.

    The key capabilities of NSX Distributed IDS/IPS include:

    • Distributed analysis
    • Curated, context-based signature distribution
    • Application context-driven threat detection
    • Policy and state mobility
    • Automated policy lifecycle management

    Use cases for NSX Distributed IDS/IPS include:

    • Easily achieving regulatory compliance
    • Virtualizing security zones
    • Replacing discrete appliances
    • Virtual patching vulnerabilities

    NSX Advanced Threat Analyzer (Sandbox)

    Included with NSX Advanced Threat Prevention, Advanced Threat Analyzer provides complete malware analysis and enables accurate detection and prevention of advanced threats. It deconstructs every behavior engineered into a file or URL, and sees all instructions that a program executes, all memory content, and all operating system activity.

    NSX NDR Sandbox Ransomware

    Other malware detection technologies, such as traditional sandboxes, only have visibility down to the operating system level. They can inspect content and identify potentially malicious code, but they can’t interact with malware like NSX Advanced Threat Analyzer can. As a result, they have significantly lower detection rates and higher false positives, in addition to being easily identified and evaded by advanced malware. (Advanced threats evade other sandboxing technologies by recognizing the sandbox environment or using kernel-level exploits.)

    VMware Threat Analysis Unit (TAU)

    With the Lastline acquisition VMware could further increase the capabilities provided by the VMware Carbon Black Threat Analysis Unit (TAU) with network-centric research and behavioral analysis.

    The VMware Threat Analysis Unit automatically shares the malware characteristics, behaviors and associated IoCs (Indicator of Compromises) of every malicious object curated and analyzed by VMware with all VMware customers and partners.

    NSX Advanced Threat Analyzer continuously updates the VMware TAU in real time with intelligence from partner and customer environments around the world.

    NSX Security Packages – How to get NSX ATP

    According to the knowledge base article Product Offerings for VMware NSX Security 3.1.x (81231), the new NSX Security editions became available in October 2020:

    • NSX Firewall for Baremetal Hosts. For organizations needing an agent-based network segmentation solution.
    • NSX Firewall. For organizations with one or more sites (optionally including public cloud endpoints) that primarily need advanced security services, select advanced networking capabilities, and traffic flow visibility and security operations with NSX Intelligence.
    • NSX Firewall with Advanced Threat Protection. For organizations that need NSX Firewall capabilities as well as advanced threat prevention capabilities, such as IDS/IPS, threat analysis, and network detection and response.

    Use Case with Network Virtualization

    If you are a customer with a NSX Data Center Advanced or Enterprise+ license, who uses NSX for network virtualization only today, you just need the “NSX ATP add-on” for NSX Data Center Advanced or Enterprise+.

    Note: The ATP add-on requires NSX-T 3.1 and above.

    Use Case without Network Virtualization (no NSX Data Center)

    If you have no need for network virtualization for now, you have the following options:

    1. If you look for base firewall features, you can get started with the NSX Firewall license.
    2. Should you look for base firewall features plus advanced threat protection, then start with NSX Firewall with Advanced Threat Protection.
    3. From here you still can down the network virtualization path and get the NSX Data Center Enterprise+ add-on for ATP

    Use Case for VCF Customers

    VCF customers have the option to start with the NSX ATP add-on for NSX NDC Adv/Ent+ as well.

    If you are looking for more even security, want NSX Advanced Load Balancer (GSLB, WAF) and/or Carbon Black Cloud Workload Protection (NGAV, EDR, Audit & Remediation) as well, then you have to get the “network and app security” or “advanced security” add-on.

    Carbon Black Endpoint Detection and Response (EDR)

    Before the Carbon Black acquisition, VMware already had strong technology, but was not seen or known as cybersecurity vendor. And it was really this acquisition that made the whole industry understand that VMware had to be taken seriously now as a security vendor.

    So, what is EDR according to Wikipedia?

    “Endpoint detection and response technology is used to protect endpoints, which are computer hardware devices, from threat. Creators of the EDR technology-based platforms deploy tools to gather data from endpoint devices, and then analyze the data to reveal potential cyber threats and issues. It is a protection against hacking attempts and theft of user data. The software is installed on the end-user device and it is continually monitored. The data is stored in a centralized database. In an incident when a threat is found, the end-user is immediately prompted with preventive list of actions.”

    EDR is essential since local activities on machines that may be malicious are not visible on the network. VMware Carbon Black EDR is an incident response and threat hunting solution designed for security operations centers (SOCs) and incident response (IR) teams. Enterprise EDR is delivered through the VMware Carbon Black Cloud, an endpoint protection platform that consolidates security in the cloud using a single agent, console and dataset.

    The Lastline acquisition, which came after Carbon Black, was just another brilliant move from VMware!

    XDR – VMware Security brings together EDR and NDR

    Again, while EDR protects endpoints, NDR protects the network, so that an organization’s entire IT infrastructure is secured. EDR gives security professionals visibility into endpoints that might be compromised, but this isn’t enough when an attack has moved across the network and into other systems by the time the security team is aware of it.

    This is where XDR comes in. VMware rolled out its Extended Detection and Response (XDR) strategy at VMworld 2020. By the way, it was in 2020 when Gartner named XDR as one of the top nine cybersecurity trends.

    By providing a holistic view of activity across the system that avoids visibility gaps, XDR allows security teams to understand where a threat comes from and how it’s spreading across the environment – in order to eliminate it. In other words, XDR offers greater analysis and correlation capabilities and a holistic point of view.

    EDR NDR Context Correlation

    VMware’s XDR platform is the Carbon Black Cloud. Carbon Black Cloud’s evolution into an XDR platform includes product integrations with existing VMware products like Workspace ONE, vSphere and the NSX service-defined firewall, as well as third-party partner platforms.

    At the Carbon Black Connect 2020 event, VMware announced launched their Next-Gen SOC Alliance that features integrations with the VMware Carbon Black Cloud to deliver key XDR capabilities and context into Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) technologies.

    We’re in an epic war against cybercrime. We know the asymmetric nature of this war – you will not win by trying to staff your SOC with more analysts. Nor can the battle be won by deploying an individual technology focused on only one part of your IT infrastructure. EDR and NDR along with your SIEM form the winning combination you need to win the war.

    Conclusion

    The Carbon Black acquisition gave VMware a strong cybersecurity foundation to build on. The recent acquisition of Lastline VMware added sandboxing and network traffic analysis capabilities to their internal firewall, which is provided by NSX.

    I don’t think it’s about “can VMware become a leading cybersecurity vendor” anymore. VMware has the most advanced internal firewall and is already becoming a leading cybersecurity vendor. The recent Global InfoSec award just confirms this statement:

    • Most Innovative in Endpoint Security” for VMware Carbon Black Cloud
    • “Market Leader in Firewall” for VMware NSX Service-defined Firewall

    If you want to learn and see more, this YouTube video with Stijn Vanveerdeghem, Sr. Technical Product Manager and Chad Skipper, Global Security Technologist, is a good start.

    Thanks for reading! 🙂