Current vSphere Subscription Licensing Options

Current vSphere Subscription Licensing Options

VMware is giving their customers more and more the option to move towards a subscription-based licensing model. In general, companies are moving away from the large pay-up-front deals and replace them with recurring subscriptions. Vendors like VMware are making a lot of investments to provide the structures, processes and capabilities to offer subscription licenses (and SaaS services). Organizations see the benefits of subscription licenses and this blog describes the current options if you want to move your vSphere perpetual licenses towards vSphere subscription.

vSphere Advantage – vSphere Subscription Service

Since December 2021, VMware offers vSphere Advantage in limited regions (aka Initial Availability).

vSphere Advantage gives you the flexibility to manage and operate your on-premises vSphere infrastructure while leveraging several VMware Cloud capabilities:

  • Transition from vSphere perpetual to vSphere subscription-based consumption for your vSphere deployments
  • Complete view of the globally distributed on-premises vSphere inventory
  • VMware-managed vCenter Servers (aka Project Arctic, not GA yet)

From a centralized VMware Cloud Console you can monitor events, alerts, capacity utilization, and the security posture of your vSphere infrastructure.

vSphere Advantage VMware Cloud Console

It is also possible now for you to plan and upgrade your existing vSphere licensing keys and replace them with vSphere Advantage, which enables you to make use of keyless entitlements. This keyless entitlement makes it very easy for customers to stay compliant all the time and to understand the current subscription usage.

vSphere Advantage VMware Cloud Console VMs

To start using vSphere Advantage, you must enable communication between your on-premises vCenter Server and VMware Cloud by using a vCenter Cloud Gateway. This requires an outbound connection (443, HTTPS) only, no VPN is needed.

 

Current vCenter Server Requirements:

  • The vCenter Server version must be 7.0 Update 3a and later
  • Configure the vCenter Server with a backup and restore mechanism
  • Dedicate at least three ESXi hosts for the vCenter Server. (Recommended)
  • The vCenter Server must be self-managed. It must manage its own ESXi hosts and virtual machines

Unsupported vCenter Configurations:

  • Ensure that the vCenter Server is not configured in High Availability mode
  • If the vCenter Server is configured in Enhanced Linked Mode (ELM), unlink it from ELM. See Repoint a vCenter Server Node to a New Domain. ELM is no longer required because with vSphere Advantage you can monitor your entire vSphere inventory in a single pane of glass.
  • Ensure that the vCenter Server is not configured with NSX for vSphere, vRealize Operations Manager, Site Recovery Manager, vCloud Suite, or vSAN.

Project Arctic – VMware-Managed vCenter (Roadmap)

VMware introduced Project Arctic at VMworld 2021. Now it’s called vSphere Advantage. While a hybrid cloud operating model for vSphere becomes default now, it’s not yet possible to let VMware manage your vCenter Servers. We can expect that this capability will be shipped and made generally available somewhen in 2022.

VMware Edge Compute Stack

Edge Compute Stack (ECS) is a purpose-built stack that is available in three different editions (information based on initial availability from VMworld 2021):

VMware Edge Comput Stack Editions

As you can see, each VMware Edge Compute Stack edition has the vSphere Enterprise+ (hypervisor) included. Software-defined storage with vSAN is optional, but Tanzu for running containers is always part of each edition.

Note: The Edge Compute Stack includes vSphere subscription licenses.

Other Options

If you are running the VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) stack and look for a managed service offering, which includes subscription-based licensing, have a look at the following alternatives:

As you can see, you can start small with vSphere Advantage and grow big with VMware Cloud Universal as the final destination.

Build a Digital Manufacturing Platform with the VMware Edge Compute Stack

Build a Digital Manufacturing Platform with the VMware Edge Compute Stack

VMware revealed their edge computing vision at VMworld 2021. In VMware’s view the multi-cloud extends from the public clouds to private clouds to edge. Edge is about bringing apps and services closer to where they are needed, especially in sectors like retail, transportation, energy and manufacturing.

In verticals like manufacturing the edge was always important. It’s about producing things than you can sell. If you cannot produce, you lose time and money. Reliability, stability and factory uptime are not new requirements. But why is edge becoming so important now?

Without looking at any analyst report and only providing experience from the field, it is clear why. Almost all of the large enterprises are migrating workloads from their global (central) data centers to the public cloud. At the same time, customers are looking at new innovations and technologies to connect their machines, processes, people and data in a much more efficient way.

Which requirement did all my customers have in common? They didn’t want to move their dozens or hundreds of edge infrastructures to the public cloud, because the factories should work independently and autonomously in case of a WAN outage for example. Additionally, some VMware technologies were already deployed at the edge.

VMware Edge Compute Stack

This is why VMware introduced the so-called “Edge Compute Stack” (ECS) in October 2021, which is provides a unified platform to run VMs alongside containerized applications at the far edge (aka enterprise edge). ECS is a purpose-built stack that is available in three different editions (information based on initial availability from VMworld 2021):

VMware Edge Comput Stack Editions

As you can see, each VMware Edge Compute Stack edition has the vSphere Enterprise+ (hypervisor) included, software-defined storage with vSAN is optional, but Tanzu for running containers is always included.

While ECS is great, the purpose of this article is about highlighting different solutions and technologies that help you to build the foundation for a digital manufacturing platform.

IT/OT Convergence

You most probably have a mix of home-grown and COTS (commercial off-the-shelf) software, that need to be deployed in your edge locations (e.g., factories, markets, shops etc.). In manufacturing, OT (operational technology) vendors have just started the adoption of container technologies due to unique technology requirements and the business model that relies on proprietary systems.

The OT world is typically very hardware-centric and uses proprietary architectures. These systems and architectures, which were put into production 15-20 years ago, are still functional. It just worked.

While these methods and architectures have been very good, the manufacturing industry realized that this static and inflexible approach resulted in a technology debt, that didn’t allow any innovation for a long period of time.

Manufacturing companies are moving to a cloud-native architecture that should provide more flexibility and vendor interoperability with the same focus in mind: To provide a reliable, scalable and flexible infrastructure.

This is when VMware becomes relevant again with their (edge) compute stack. VMware vSphere allows you to run VMs and containers on the same platform. This is true for IT and OT workloads, that’s IT partial IT/OT covergence.

You may ask yourself how you then would  design the network. I’ll answer this topic in a minute.

Kubernetes Operations

IT platform teams, who design and manage the edge have to expand their (VMware) platform capabilities that allow them to deploy and host containers. Like I said before, this is why Tanzu is included in all the VMware Edge Compute Stack editions. Kubernetes is the new Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) and so it makes only sense that the container deployment and management capability is included.

How do you provide centralized or regional Kubernetes management and operations if you don’t have a global (regional) data center anymore?

With a hybrid approach, by using Tanzu for Kubernetes Operations (TKO), a set of SaaS services that allow you to run, manage, connect and secure your container infrastructure across clouds and edge locations.

IT/OT Security

Now you have the right platform to run your IT and OT workloads on the same hypervisor or compute platform. You also have a SaaS-based control plane to deploy and manage your Kubernetes clusters. 

As soon as you are dealing with a very dynamic environment where containers exist, you are having discussions about software-defined networking or virtualized networks. Apart from that, every organization and manufacturer are transforming their network and security at the edge and talk about network segmentation (and cybersecurity!).

Traditionally, you’ll find the Purdue Model implemented, a concept model for industrial control systems (ICS) that breaks the network in two zones:

  • Information Technology (IT)
  • Operational Technology (OT)

The Purdue Model of Computer Integrated Manufacturing

Source: https://www.automationworld.com/factory/iiot/article/21132891/is-the-purdue-model-still-relevant 

In these IT and OT zones you’ll find subzones that describe different layers and the ICS components. As you can see as well, each level is secured by a dedicated physical firewall appliance. From this drawing one could say that the IT and OT world converge in the DMZ layer, because of the bidirectional traffic flow.

VMware is one of the pioneers when it comes to network segmentation that helps you driving IT/OT convergence. This is made possible by using network virtualization. As soon as you are using the VMware hypervisor and its integrated virtual switch, you are already using a virtualized network.

To bring IT and OT closer together and to provide a virtualized network design based on the Purdue Model including a zero-trust network architecture, you would start looking at VMware NSX to implement that.

In case you are looking for a software-defined load balancer or application delivery controller, have a look at NSX Advanced Load Balancer (formerly known as Avi).

PLC Virtualization

In level 2 of the Purdue Model, which hosts the systems for supervising, monitoring and controlling the physical process, you will find components like human-machine interfaces (HMI) and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) software.

In level 3, manufacturing execution systems (MES) can be found.

Nowadays, most companies already run their HMIs, SCADAs and MES software in virtual machines on the VMware vSphere hypervisor.

The next big thing is the virtualization of PLCs (programmable logic controller), which is an industrial computer that controls manufacturing processes, such as machines, assembly lines and robotic devices. Traditional PLC implementations in hardware are costly and lack scalability.

That is why the company SDA was looking for a less hardware-centric but more software-centric approach and developed the SDA vPLC that is able to meet sub 10ms performance.

This vPLC solution is based on a hybrid architecture between a cloud system and the industrial workload at the edge, which has been tested on VMware’s Edge Compute Stack.

Monitoring & Troubleshooting

One area, which we haven’t highlighted yet, is the monitoring and troubleshooting of virtual machines (VMs). The majority of your workloads are still VM-based. How do you monitor these workloads and applications, deal with resource and capacity planning/management, and troubleshoot, if you don’t have a central data center anymore?

With the same approach as before – just with a cloud-based service. Most organizations rely on vRealize Operations (vROps) and vRealize Log Insight (vRLI) for their IT operations and platform teams gain visibility in all the main and edge data centers.

You can still use vROps and vRLI (on-premises) in your factories, but VMware recommends using the vRealize Cloud Universal (vRCU) SaaS management suite, that gives you the flexibility to deploy your vRealize products on-premises or as SaaS. In an edge use case the SaaS-based control plane just makes sense.

In addition to vRealize Operations Cloud you can make use of the vRealize True Visibility Suite (TVS), that extends your vRealize Operations platform with management packs and connectors to monitor different compute, storage, network, application and database vendors and solutions.

Factory VDI

Some of your factories may need virtual apps or desktops and for edge use cases there are different possible architectures available. Where a factory has a few hundred of concurrent users, a dedicated standalone VDI/RDSH deployment might make sense. What if you have hundreds of smaller factories and don’t want to maintain a complete VDI/RDSH infrastructure?

VMware is currently working on a new architecture for VMware Horizon (aka VMware Horizon Next-Generation) and their goal is to provide a single, unified platform across on-premises and cloud environments.  They also plan to do that by introducing a pod-less architecture that moves key components to the VMware-hosted Horizon (Cloud) Control Plane.

This architecture is perfectly made for edge use cases and with this approach customers can reduce costs, expect increased scalability, improve troubleshooting and provide a seamless experience for any edge or cloud location.

VMware Horizon Next-Generation 

Management for Enterprise Wearables

If your innovation and tech team are exploring new possibilities with wearable technologies like augmented reality (AR), mixed reality (MR) and virtual reality (VR) head-mounted displays (HMDs), then VMware Workspace ONE Unified Endpoint Management (UEM) can help you to securely manage these devices!

Workspace ONE UEM is very strong when it comes to the modern management of Windows Desktop and macOS operating systems, and device management (Android/iOS).

Conclusion

As you can see, VMware has a lot to offer for the enterprise edge. Organizations that are multi-cloud and keep their edge locations on-premises, have a lot of new technologies and possibilities nowadays.

VMware’s strengths are unfolded as soon as you combine different solutions. And these solutions help you to work on your priorities and requirements to build the right foundation for a digital manufacturing platform.

VMware Cloud on AWS – The Power of VMware and AWS

VMware Cloud on AWS – The Power of VMware and AWS

VMware Cloud on AWS (VMC on AWS) brings VMware’s software-defined data center (SDDC) stack to the AWS cloud. By using the same vSphere-based virtualization/cloud technology on-premises and in the public cloud, you can create a true hybrid cloud architecture, that enables you to get consistent operations by using consistent infrastructure.

VMC on AWS Overview

This solution comes with optimized access to the AWS services and is delivered, sold and supported by VMware, AWS and their partner networks.

As you can see above, VMC on AWS comes with the same VMware tools and integrates the VMware Cloud Foundation stack (vSphere for compute, vSAN for storage, NSX for networking) along with vCenter for management.

VMware Cloud on AWS runs on dedicated Amazon EC2 bare-metal infrastructure.

Instance Types

VMware Cloud on AWS comes with two different host configurations, which both require a minimum of two hosts per cluster.

VMC on AWS Instances

For identifying the right host types for specific use cases, check out the VMware Cloud on AWS sizer.

Note: 99.9% SLA for non-stretched clusters, 99.99% for stretched clusters

Single Host Starter Configuration

VMC on AWS allows you to deploy a starter configuration with a single host only (not available with i3en.metal hosts).

This small SDDC configuration allows customers to get their first experiences with this hybrid cloud offering during a 60-day time period. Such a setup is only appropriate for test and development or proof of concept use cases. You can run production workloads on this small VMC on AWS environment if you scale up to the minimum of two hosts before the 60-day period ends, otherwise your evaluation ends with you losing data.

Note: Not all features of the standard VMC service offering are available in this limited setting. The VMC on AWS service level offering also does not apply to this one-node offering.

Included VMware Software

The following software is included in single host and production configurations:

Single Hosts (non-production environments) Production (minimum 2 hosts)

Includes

  • VMware SDDC software: vSphere, vSAN, NSX-T, vCenter Server
  • VMware HCX
  • Dedicated Amazon EC2 Bare Metal Instances
  • VMware Global Support

Purchase separately

  • VMware Site Recovery
  • VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery
  • VMware vRealize Automation Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Operations Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Log Insight Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Network Insight Cloud
  • VMware Tanzu Standard

Not supported

  • Lifecycle management by VMware (updates, patches and upgrades)
  • High Availability (HA) and Stretched Clusters
  • Service Level Agreement (SLA)

Includes

  • VMware SDDC software: vSphere, vSAN, NSX-T, vCenter Server
  • VMware HCX
  • VMware Tanzu Services: TKG Service + TMC Essentials
  • Dedicated Amazon EC2 Bare Metal Instances
  • VMware Global Support
  • Lifecycle management by VMware (updates, patches and upgrades)
  • Support for High Availability (HA) and Stretched Clusters
  • Service Level Agreement (SLA)

Purchase separately

  • VMware Site Recovery
  • VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery
  • VMware NSX Advanced Firewall
  • VMware vRealize Automation Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Operations Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Log Insight Cloud
  • VMware vRealize Network Insight Cloud
  • VMware Tanzu Standard

VMware Cloud on AWS Outposts

If you want to get the agility and innovation of (VMware) Cloud in your own data center, delivered as a service, then VMC on AWS Outposts is for you.

VMC on AWS Outposts is a fully managed on-premises as-a-service offering, that stretches VMC on AWS to your data center or edge location. You’ll get dedicated Amazon Nitro-based EC2 bare-metal instances delivered on-premises with VMware Cloud Foundation running on top.

VMC on AWS Outposts

What’s included in the offering?

  • AWS Outposts 42u rack (we can also expect a half-rack offering in the future)
    • 3-8 hosts configurations based on i3en.metal
    • Dark host capacity included (for remediation, EDRS, scale-out and lifecycle management purposes)
    • Installed by AWS
  • AWS managed dedicated Nitro-based i3en.metal EC2 instance with local SSD storage
  • VMware managed SDDC software – vSphere, vSAN, NSX-T, vCenter Server
  • VMware HCX
  • VMware Cloud Console
  • Support by VMware SREs
  • Supply chain, shipment logistics and onsite installation by AWS
  • Ongoing hardware monitoring with break/fix support.

Use Cases

VMware Cloud on AWS Outposts is made for multiple use cases:

  • Data/App Locality
  • Low latency
  • Local data processing
  • Data sovereignty/compliance
  • Infrastructure modernization
  • Branche Office or large edge modernization

But this offering and VMC on AWS in general come with multiple other use cases which help orgnaizations to fulfill their cloud strategy.

App Modernization

VMware Cloud on AWS provides an infrastructure platform option for customers to modernize their existing enterprise applications on and enables them to run their enterprise workloads of today and tomorrow. With VMware Cloud on AWS, customers can run, monitor, and manage their Kubernetes clusters and virtual machines – all on the same infrastructure. VMware Tanzu Kubernetes Grid provides a consistent, upstream-compatible distribution of Kubernetes, that is tested, signed, and supported by VMware. Tanzu Kubernetes Grid is central to many of the offerings in the VMware Tanzu portfolio.

Solution Brief

Cloud Migration / Data Center Extension

VMC on AWS can help customers to expand to new locations. Maybe it’s an unplanned project or there are temporary or seasonal capacity needs. Some customers are also using such an offering to build a flexible test, lab or training environment in the public cloud.

Solution Brief

Cloud VDI

Adopt a robust, feature-rich cloud platform for virtual desktops and applications that can be used to deliver complete VDI infrastructure from the cloud. Or you can extend an existing on-premises VDI environment for desktop bursting, protection or proximity to applications running in AWS. Optimize infrastructure costs with flexible, consumption-based billing while paying only for what you use.

Solution Brief

Disaster Recovery

Another typical use case is disaster recovery. Customers are looking for an offsite approach with which they can prepare themselves for different kind of scenarios with “warm standby” or “active/active” configurations. There are different architectural options and also different solutions from VMware available, e.g.:

Hybrid Cloud Extension (HCX)

How can you bridge the gap between on-premises data centers and VMC on AWS to enable application migrations or workload mobility? HCX creates an encrypted, high-throughput, WAN-optimized, load-balanced, traffic-engineered hybrid interconnect automates the creation of network extensions.

In short: VMware HCX can interconnect different vSphere-based clouds and with that you achieve a fabric for workload mobility by using vMotion over different clouds. It even preserves existing network connections!

Imagine how much easier and faster application migrations can be done now.

Let’s see if there is a future, that customers need full workload mobility where regular migrations from and to different clouds can be done. Maybe there is a customer, who migrates workloads today from on-prem to VMC on AWS, tomorrow to Azure VMware Solution, the next week to Google Cloud VMware Engine, and in the end back to an on-premises data center where another fully managed service like VMC on Dell EMC is deployed. 😀

VMware Cloud on AWS with Tanzu Services

It was mentioned above already, VMware Cloud on AWS includes “Tanzu Kubernetes Service” and “Tanzu Mission Control Essentials”.

VMware Cloud with Tanzu Services has been introduced at VMworld 2021 as the “Easy path to enterprise-grade Kubernetes on a fully managed, multi-cloud ready IaaS and CaaS platform”:

VMware Cloud with Tanzu Services

 

This was also when Tanzu Services became available for VMC on AWS with the following capabilities:

  • Managed Tanzu Kubernetes Grid Service: Provision Tanzu Kubernetes clusters within a few minutes using a simple, fast, and self-service experience in the VMware Cloud console. The underlying SDDC infrastructure and capacity required for Kubernetes workloads is fully managed by VMware. Use vCenter Server for managing Kubernetes workloads by deploying Kubernetes clusters, provisioning role-based access and allocating capacity for Developer teams. Manage multiple TKG clusters as namespaces with observability, troubleshooting and resiliency in vCenter Server.
  • Built in support for Tanzu Mission Control Essentials: Attach upstream compliant Kubernetes clusters including Amazon EKS and Tanzu Kubernetes Grid clusters. Manage lifecycle for Tanzu Kubernetes Grid clusters and centralize platform operations for Kubernetes clusters using the Kubernetes management plane offered by Tanzu Mission Control. Tanzu Mission Control provides a global visibility across clusters and clouds and increases security and governance by automating operational tasks such as access and security management at scale.

VMware Cloud with Tanzu Services

Take a look at the VMware Tanzu Mission Control Feature Comparison Chart to better understand the feature set of TMC Essentials.

Did you know that the Tanzu Mission Control Standard Package is included with TMC Essentials?

As of November 2021, new clusters registered with TMC will have the Carvel package manager (the kapp-controller), deployed within the cluster. The “Catalog” page in the Tanzu Mission Control console allows you to view packages available from the Tanzu Standard repository (and your own custom Carvel package repositories) and install them in your Kubernetes clusters.

Tanzu Mission Control Packages

Application Transformer for VMware Tanzu for VMC on AWS

VMware announced the tech preview for Application Transformer for VMware Tanzu for VMware Cloud on AWS in September 2021.

Application Transformer for VMware Tanzu is a tool that aids organizations in discovering application types, visualizing application topology, choosing a modernization approach based on scores, and containerizing and migrating suitable legacy applications to enhance business outcomes. As an agentless tool, Application Transformer for Tanzu utilizes the VMware vCenter API to introspect VMs across an entire vSphere or VMware Cloud on AWS-based data center.

Application Transformer can help you to convert virtual machines and application components to OCI-compliant container images, that then can be deployed into the Tanzu Kubernetes stack.

There are several ways how customers get access to Application Transformer for VMware Tanzu:

Good news for everyone is that Application Transformer for VMware Tanzu became generally available in February 2022. With this, VMware Cloud on AWS customers also have limited access to this offering from now on. The access is through integration with VMware Cloud console. If customers desire full access to Application Transformer, they need to buy Tanzu Standard, Tanzu Advanced, Tanzu for Kubernetes Operations, or App Navigator.

Features & Roadmap

VMware provides a lot of information about the features and roadmap of VMware Cloud on AWS.

VMC on AWS FAQ

There is a large collection of FAQs available than can be found here.

VMware Cloud Foundation – A Technical Overview

VMware Cloud Foundation – A Technical Overview

While I was studying for the VMware Cloud Foundation Specialist certification, I realized that there is no one-pager available that gives you a short technical explanation of VMware Cloud Foundation.

What is VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF)?

VMware Cloud Foundation is a hybrid cloud platform that provides a full-stack hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) that is made for modernizing data centers and deploying modern container-based applications. VCF integrates different components like vSphere (compute), vSAN (storage), NSX (networking) and some parts of the vRealize Suite in a HCI solution with infrastructure automation and software lifecycle management. The idea of VCF follows a standardized, automated and validated approach that simplifies the management of all the needed software-defined infrastructure resources.

This standardized and automated software stack provides customers consistent infrastructure and operations in a cloud operating model that can be deployed on-premises, at the edge or public cloud.

Cloud Foundation has Tanzu Standard integrated to provide a unified platform that lets virtual machines (VMs), Kubernetes and containers co-exist on the same platform.

Note: The Tanzu Standard Edition is included in the VCF Standard, Advanced and Enterprise edition

What software is being delivered in Cloud Foundation?

The BoM (bill of materials) is changing with each VCF release. Let me take the VCF 4.3 release as example to list the components and software versions:

  • VMware SDDC Manager 4.3
  • vSphere 7.0 Update 2a with Tanzu
  • vCenter Server 7.0 P03
  • vSAN 7.0 Update 2
  • NSX-T 3.1.3
  • VMware Workspace ONE Access 3.3.5
  • vRealize Log Insight 8.4
  • vRealize Operations 8.4
  • vRealize Automation 8.4.1
  • (vRealize Network Insight)

Note: VCF 4.3 deploys vRealize Lifecycle Manager (VRSLCM) 8.4.1, which then deploys and provides ongoing lifecycle management for other vRealize components. Currently, vRealize Network Insight needs to be imported manually into VRSLCM and then deployed.

Which VMware Cloud Foundation editions are available?

A VCF comparison matrix can be found here.

VMware Cloud Foundation Editions

VMware Cloud Foundation Architecture

VCF is made for greenfield deployments (brownfield not supported) and supports two different architecture models:

  • Standard Architecture
  • Consolidated Architecture

VMware Cloud Foundation Architecture

The standard architecture separates management workloads and lets them run on a dedicated management workload domain. Customer workloads are deployed on a separate virtual infrastructure workload domain (VI workload domain). Each workload domain is managed by a separate vCenter Server instance, which allows autonomous licensing and lifecycle management.

                                                 

Note: The standard architecture is the recommended model, because it separates management workloads from customers workloads.

Customers with a small environment (or a PoC) can start with a consolidated architecture. This allows you to run customer and management workloads together on the same workload domain (WLD).

Note: The management workload domain’s default cluster datastore must use vSAN. Other WLDs can use vSAN, NFS, FC and vVols for the principal storage.

VMware Cloud Foundation Storage

Does VCF provide flexible workload domain sizing?

Yes, that’s possible. You can license the WLDs based on your needs and use the editions that make the most sense depending on your use cases.

VMware Cloud Foundation Flexible Licensing

How many physical nodes are required to deploy VMware Cloud Foundation?

A minimum of four physical nodes is required to start in a consolidated architecture or to build your management workload domain. Four nodes are required to ensure that the environment can tolerate a failure while another node is being updated.

VI workload domains require a minimum of three nodes.

This means, to start with a standard architecture, you need to have the requirements (and money) to start with at least seven physical nodes.

What are the minimum hardware requirements?

These minimum specs have been listed for the management WLD since VCF 4.0 (September 2020):

VMware Cloud Foundation Hardware Requirements

What about edge/remote use cases?

When you would like to deploy VMware Cloud Foundation workload domains at a remote site, you can deploy so-called “VCF Remote Clusters”. Those remote workload domains are managed by the VCF instance at the central site and you can perform the same full-stack lifecycle management for the remote sites from the central SDDC Manager.

Prerequisites to deploy remote clusters can be found here.

Does VCF support HCI Mesh?

Yes. VMware Cloud Foundation 4.2 and later supports sharing remote datastores with HCI Mesh for VI workload domains.

HCI Mesh is a software-based approach for disaggregation of compute and storage resources in vSAN. HCI Mesh brings together multiple independent vSAN clusters by enabling cross-cluster utilization of remote datastore capacity within vCenter Server. HCI Mesh enables you to efficiently utilize and consume data center resources, which provides simple storage management at scale.

What is SDDC Manager?

SDDC Manager is a preconfigured virtual appliance that is deployed in the management workload domain for creating workload domains, provisioning additional virtual infrastructure and lifecycle management of all the software-defined data center (SDDC) management components.

You use SDDC Manager in VMware Cloud Foundation to perform the following operations:

  • Commissioning or decommissioning ESXi hosts
  • Deployment of workload domains
  • Extension of clusters in the management and workload domains with ESXi hosts
  • Adding clusters to the management domain and workload domains
  • Support for network pools for host configuration in a workload domain
  • Product licenses storage
  • Deployment of vRealize Suite components.
  • Lifecycle management of the virtual infrastructure components in all workload domains, and of vRealize Suite Lifecycle Manager components.
  • Certificate management
  • Password management and rotation
  • NSX-T Edge cluster deployment in the management domain and workload domains
  • Backup configuration

VMware Cloud Foundation SDDC Manager Dashboard

How many resources does the VCF management WLD need during the bring-up process?

We know that VCF includes vSphere (ESXi and vCenter), vSAN, SDDC Manager, NSX-T and eventually some components of the vRealize Suite. The following table should give you an idea how the resource requirements look like to get VCF up and running:

VMware Cloud Foundation Resource Requirements

If you are interested to know how many resources the vRealize Suite will consume of the management workload domain , have a look at this table:

VMware Cloud Foundation Resource Requirements vRealize

How can I migrate my workloads from a non-VCF environment to a new VCF deployment?

VMware HCX provides a path to modernize from a legacy data center architecture by migrating to VMware Cloud Foundation.

VMware Cloud Foundation HCX Migration

Where can I get more information about VMware Tanzu and the Tanzu Standard edition?

Please have a look at these articles:

What is NSX Advanced Load Balancer?

NSX Advanced Load Balancer (NSX ALB) formerly known as Avi is a solution that provides advanced load balancing capabilities for VMware Cloud Foundation. 

Which security add-ons are available with VMware Cloud Foundation?

VMware has different workload and network security offerings to complement VCF:

Is there also a VCF subscription license?

Yes, you can purchase VCF-S (VCF Subscription) licenses as part of the VMware Cloud Universal program.

Can I get VCF as a managed service offering?

Yes, this is possible. Please have a look at Data Center as a Service based on VMware Cloud Foundation.

Where can I get more information?

Please consult the VMware Foundation 4.3 FAQ for more information about VMware Cloud Foundation. 

 

A Universal License and Technology to Build a Flexible Multi-Cloud

A Universal License and Technology to Build a Flexible Multi-Cloud

In November 2020 I wrote an article called “VMware Cloud Foundation And The Cloud Management Platform Simply Explained“. That piece was focused on the “why” and “when” VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) makes sense for your organization. It also includes business values and hints that VCF is more than just about technology. Cloud Foundation is one of the most important drivers and THE enabler for to fulfill VMware’s multi-cloud strategy.

If you are not familiar enough with VMware’s multi-cloud strategy, then please have a look at my article “VMware Multi-Cloud and Hyperscale Computing” first.

To summarize the two above mentioned articles, one can say, that VMware Cloud Foundation is a software-defined data center (SDDC) that can run in any cloud. In “any cloud” means that VCF can also be consumed as a service through other cloud provider partners like:

Additionally, Cloud Foundation and the whole SDDC can be consumed as a managed offering called DCaaS or LCaaS (Data Center / Local Cloud as a service).

Let’s say a customer is convinced that a “VCF everywhere” approach is right for them and starts building up private and public clouds based on VMware’s technologies. This means that VMware Cloud Foundation now runs in their private and public cloud.

Note: This doesn’t mean that the customer cannot use native public cloud workloads and services anymore. They can simply co-exist.

The customer is at a point now where they have achieved a consistent infrastructure. What’s up next? The next logical step is to use the same automation, management and security consoles to achieve consistent operations.

A traditional VMware customer goes for the vRealize Suite now, because they would need vRealize Automation (vRA) for automation and vRealize Operations (vROps) to monitor the infrastructure.

The next topic in this customer’s journey would be application modernization, which includes topics containerization and Kubernetes. VMware’s answer for this is the Tanzu portfolio. For the sake of this example let’s go with “Tanzu Standard”, which is one of four editions available in the Tanzu portfolio (aka VMware Tanzu).

VMware Cloud Foundation

Let’s have a look at the customer’s bill of materials so far:

  • VMware Cloud Foundation on-premises (vSphere, vSAN, NSX)
  • VMware Cloud on AWS)
  • VMware Cloud on Dell EMC (locally managed VCF service for special edge use cases)
  • vRealize Automation
  • vRealize Operations
  • Tanzu Standard (includes Tanzu Kubernetes Grid and Tanzu Mission Control)

Looking at this list above, we see that their infrastructure is equipped with three different VMware Cloud Foundation flavours (on-prem, hyperscaler managed, locally managed) complemented by products of the vRealize Suite and the Tanzu portfolio.

This infrastructure with its different technologies, components and licenses has been built up over the past few years. But organizations are nowadays asking for more flexibility than ever. By flexibility I mean license portability and a subscription model.

VMware Cloud Universal

On 31st March 2021 VMware introduced VMware Cloud Universal (VMCU). VMCU is the answer to make the customer’s life easier, because it gives you the choice and flexibility in which clouds you want to run your infrastructure and consume VMware Cloud offerings as needed. It even allows you to convert existing on-premises VCF licenses to a VCF-subscription license.

The VMCU program includes the following technologies and licenses:

  • VMware Cloud Foundation Subscription
  • VMware Cloud on AWS
  • Google Cloud VMware Engine
  • VMware Cloud on Dell EMC
  • vRealize Cloud Universal Enterprise Plus
  • Tanzu Standard Edition
  • VMware Success 360 (S360 is required with VMCU)

VMware Cloud Console

As Kit Kolbert, CTO VMware, said, “the idea is that VMware Cloud is everywhere that you want your applications to be”.

The VMware Cloud Console gives you view into all those different locations. You can quickly see what’s going on with a specific site or cloud landing zone, what its overall utilization looks like or if issues occur.

The Cloud Console has a seamless integration with vROps, which also helps you regarding capacity forecasting and (future) requirements (e.g., do I have enough capacity to meet my future demand?).

VMware Cloud Console

In short, it’s the central multi-cloud console to manage your global VMware Cloud environment.

vRealize Cloud Universal

What is part of vRealize Cloud Universal (vRCU) Enterprise Plus? vRCU is a SaaS management suite that combines on-premises and SaaS capabilities for automation, operations, log analytics and network visibility into a single offering. In other words, you get to decide where you want to deploy your management and operations tools. vRealize Cloud Universal comes in four editions and in VMCU you have the vRCU Enterprise Plus edition included with the following components:

vRealize Cloud Universal Editions

    Note: While vRCU standard, advanced and enterprise are sold as standalone editions today, the enterprise plus edition is only sold with VMCU (and as add-on to VMC on AWS).

    vRealize AI Cloud

    Have you ever heard of Project Magna? It is something that was announced at VMworld 2019, that provides adaptive optimization and a self-tuning engine for your data center. It was Pat Gelsinger who envisioned a so-called “self-driving data center”. Intelligence-driven data center might haven been a better term since Project Magna leverages artificial intelligence by using reinforcement learning, which combs through your data and runs thousands of scenarios that searches for the best regard output based on trial and error on the Magna SaaS analytics engine.

    The first instantiation began with vSAN (today also known as vRAI Cloud vSAN Optimizer), where Magna will collect data, learn from it, and make decisions that will automatically self-tune your infrastructure to drive greater performance and efficiencies.

    Today, this SaaS service is called vRealize AI Cloud.

    vRealize AI Cloud vSAN vRealize AI (vRAI) learns about your operating environments, application demands and adapts to changing dynamics, ensuring optimization per stated KPI. vRAI Cloud is only available on vRealize Operations Cloud via the vRealize Cloud Universal subscription.

    VMware Skyline

    VMware Skyline as a support service that automatically collects, aggregates, and analyzes product usage data, which proactively identifies potential problems and helps the VMware support engineers to improve the resolution time. Skyline is included in vRealize Cloud Universal because it just makes sense. A lot of customers have asked for unifying the self-service experience between Skyline and vRealize Operations Cloud. And many customers are using Skyline and vROps side by side today.

    Users can now be proactive and perform troubleshooting in a single SaaS workflow. This means customers save more time by automating Skyline proactive remediations in vROps Cloud. But Skyline supports vSphere, vSAN, NSX, vRA, VCF and VMware Horizon as well.

    VMware Cloud Universal Use Cases

    As already mentioned, VMCU makes very much sense if you are building a hybrid or multi-cloud architecture with a consistent (VMware) infrastructure. VMCU, vRCU and the Tanzu portfolio help you to create a unified control plane for your cloud infrastructure.

    Other use cases could be cloud migration or cloud bursting scenarios. If we switch back to the fictive customer before, we could use VMCU to convert existing VCF licenses to VCF-S (subscription) licenses, which in the end allow you to build a VMware-based Cloud on top of AWS (other public cloud providers are coming very soon!) for example.

    Another good example is to achieve the same service and operating model on-prem as in the public cloud: a fully managed consumable infrastructure. Meaning, to move from a self-built and self-managed VCF infrastructure to something like VMC on Dell EMC.

    How can I get VMCU?

    There is no monthly subscription model and VMware only supports one-year or three-year terms. Customers will need to sign an Enterprise License Agreement (ELA) and purchase VMCU SPP credits.

    Note: SPP credits purchased out of the program are not allowed to be used within the VMCU program!

    After purchasing the VMCU SPP credits and VMware Cloud onboarding and organization setup, you can select the infrastructure offerings to consume your SPP credits. This can be done via the VMware Cloud Console.

    Summary

    I hope this article was useful to get a better understanding about VMware Cloud Universal. It might seem a little bit complex, but that’s not true. VMCU makes your life easier and helps you to build and license a globally distributed cloud infrastructure based on VMware technology.

    VCF Subscription

     

     

     

    10 Things You Didn’t Know About VMware Tanzu

    10 Things You Didn’t Know About VMware Tanzu

    Updated on March 16, 2022

    While I was working with one of the largest companies in the world during the past year, I learned a lot about VMware Tanzu and NSX Advanced Load Balancer (formerly known as Avi). Application modernization and the containerization of applications are very complex topics.

    Customers are looking for ways to “free” their apps from infrastructure and want to go cloud-native by using/building microservices, containers and Kubernetes. VMware has a large portfolio to support you on your application modernization journey, which is the Tanzu portfolio. A lot of people still believe that Tanzu is a product – it’s not a product. Tanzu is more than just a Kubernetes runtime and as soon as people like me from VMware explain you the capabilities and possibilities of Tanzu, one tends to become overwhelmed at first.

    Why? VMware’s mission is always to abstract things and make things easier for you but this doesn’t mean you can skip a lot of the questions and topics that should be discussed:

    • Where should your containers and microservices run?
    • Do you have a multi-cloud strategy?
    • How do you want to manage your Kubernetes clusters?
    • How do you build your container images?
    • How do you secure the whole application supply chain?
    • Have you thought about vulnerability scanning for the components you use to build the containers?
    • What kind of policies would you like to set on application, network and storage level?
    • Do you need persistent storage for your containers?
    • Should it be a vSphere platform only or are you also looking at AKS, EKS, GKE etc.?
    • How are you planning to automate and configure “things”?
    • Which kind of databases or data services do you use?
    • Have you already got a tool for observability?

    With these kind of questions, you and I would figure out together, which Tanzu edition makes the most sense for you. Looking at the VMware Tanzu website, you’ll find four different Tanzu editions:

    VMware Tanzu Editions

    If you click on one of the editions, you get the possibility to compare them:

    Tanzu Editions Comparison

    Based on the capabilities listed above, customers would like to know the differences between Tanzu Standard and Advanced. Believe me, there is a lot of information I can share with you to make your life easier and to understand the Tanzu portfolio better. 🙂

    1) VMware Tanzu Standard and Advanced Features and Components

    Let’s start looking at the different capabilities and components that come with Tanzu Standard and Advanced:

    Tanzu Std vs Adv

    Tanzu Standard focuses very much on Kubernetes multi-cloud and multi-cluster management (Tanzu Kubernetes Grid with Tanzu Mission Control aka TMC), Tanzu Advanced adds a lot of capabilities to build your applications (Tanzu Application Catalog, Tanzu Build Service).

    2) Tanzu Mission Control Standard and Advanced

    Maybe you missed it in the screenshot before. Tanzu Standard comes with Tanzu Mission Control Standard, Tanzu Advanced is equipped with Tanzu Mission Control Advanced.

    Note: Announced at VMworld 2021, there is now even a third edition called Tanzu Mission Control Essentials, that was specifically made for VMware Cloud offerings such as VMC on AWS.

    I must mention here, that you could leverage the “free tier” of Tanzu Mission Control called TMC Starter. It can be combined with the Tanzu Community Edition (also free) for example or with existing clusters from other providers (AKS, GKE, EKS).

    What’s the difference between TMC Standard and Advanced? Let’s check the TMC feature comparison chart:

    • TMC Adv provides “custom roles”
    • TMC Adv lets you configure more policies (security policies – custom, images policies, networking policies, quota policies, custom policies, policy insights)
    • With Tanzu Mission Control Advanced you also get “CIS Benchmark inspections”

    What if I want Tanzu Standard (Kubernetes runtime with Tanzu Mission Control and some open- source software) but not the complete feature set of Tanzu Mission Control Advanced? Let me answer that question a little bit later. 🙂

    3) NSX Advanced Load Balancer Essentials vs. Enterprise (aka Avi Essentials vs. Enterprise)

    Yes, there are also different NSX ALB editions included in Tanzu Standard and Advanced. The NSX ALB Essentials edition is not something that you can buy separately, and it’s only included in the Tanzu Standard edition.

    The enterprise edition of NSX ALB is part of Tanzu Advanced but it can also be bought as a standalone product.

    Here are the capabilities and differences between NSX ALB Essentials and Enterprise:

    NSX ALB Essentials vs. Enterprise

    So, the Avi Enterprise edition provides a fully-featured version of NSX Advanced Load Balancer while Avi Essentials only provides L4 LB services for Tanzu.

    Note: Customers can create as many NSX ALB / Avi Service Engines (SEs) as required with the Essentials edition and you still have the possibility to set up a 3-node NSX ALB controller cluster.

    Important: It is not possible to mix the NSX ALB controllers from the Essentials and Enterprise edition. This means, that a customer, that has NSX ALB Essentials included in Tanzu Standard, and has another department using NSX ALB Enterprise for another use case, needs to run separate controller clusters. While the controllers don’t cost you anything, there is obviously some additional compute footprint coming with this constraint.

    FYI, there is also a cloud-managed option for the Avi Controllers with Avi SaaS.

    What if I want the complete feature set of NSX ALB Enterprise? Let’s put this question also aside for a moment.

    4) Container Ingress with Contour vs. NSX ALB Enterprise

    Ingress is a very important component of Kubernetes and let’s you configure how an application can or should be accessed. It is a set of routing rules that describe how traffic is routed to an application inside of a Kubernetes cluster. So, getting an application up and running is only the half side of the story. The application still needs a way for users to access it. If you would like to know more about “ingress”, I can recommend this short introduction video.

    While Contour is a great open-source project, Avi provides much more enterprise-grade features like L4 LB, L7 ingress, security/WAF, GSLB and analytics. If stability, enterprise support, resiliency, automation, elasticity and analytics are important to you, then Avi Enterprise is definitely the better fit.

    To keep it simple: If you are already thinking about NSX ALB Enterprise, then you could use it for K8s Ingress/LB and so much other use cases and services! 🙂  

    5) Observability with Grafana/Prometheus vs. Tanzu Observability

    I recently wrote a blog about “modern application monitoring with VMware Tanzu and vRealize“. This article could give you a better understanding if you want to get started with open-source software or something like Tanzu Observability, which provides much more enterprise-grade features. Tanzu Observability is considered to be a fast-moving leader according to the GigaOm Cloud Observability Report.

    What if I still want Tanzu Standard only but would like to have Tanzu Observability as well? Let’s park this question as well for another minute.

    6) Open-Source Projects Support by VMware Tanzu

    The Tanzu Standard edition comes with a lot of leading open-source technologies from the Kubernetes ecosystem. There is Harbor for container registry, Contour for ingress, Grafana and Prometheus for monitoring, Velero for backup and recovery, Fluentbit for logging, Antrea and Calico for container networking, Sonobuoy for conformance testing and Cluster API for cluster lifecycle management.

    VMware Open-Source Projects

    VMware is actively contributing to these open-source projects and still wants to give customers the flexibility and choice to use and integrate them wherever and whenever you see fit. But how are these open-source projects supported by VMware? To answer this , we can have a look at the Tanzu Toolkit (included in Tanzu Standard and Advanced):

    • Tanzu Toolkit includes enterprise-level support for Harbor, Velero, Contour, and Sonobuoy
    • Tanzu Toolkit provides advisory—or best effort—guidance on Prometheus, Grafana, and Alertmanager for use with Tanzu Kubernetes Grid. Installation, upgrade, initial tooling configuration, and bug fixes are beyond the current scope of VMware’s advisory support.

    7) Tanzu Editions Licensing

    There are two options how you can license your Tanzu deployments:

    • Per CPU Licensing – Mostly used for on-prem deployments or where standalone installations are planned (dedicated workload domain with VCF). Tanzu Standard is included in all the regular VMware Cloud Foundation editions.
    • Per Core Licensing – For non-standalone on-prem and public cloud deployments, you should license Tanzu Standard and Advanced based on number of cores used by the worker (including control plane VMs) and management nodes delivering K8s clusters. Constructs such as “vCPUs”, “virtual CPUs” and “virtual cores” are proxies (other names) for CPU cores.

    Tanzu Advanced is sold as a “pack” of software and VMware Cloud service offerings. Each purchased pack of Tanzu Advanced equals 20 cores. Example of 1 pack:

    • Spring Runtime: 20 cores
    • Tanzu Application Catalog: 20 cores
    • Tanzu SQL: 1 core (part of Tanzu Data Services)
    • Tanzu Build Service: 20 cores
    • Tanzu Observability: 160 PPS (sufficient to collect metrics for the infrastructure)
    • Tanzu Mission Control Advanced: 20 cores
    • Tanzu Service Mesh Advanced: 20 cores
    • NSX ALB Enterprise: 1 CPU = 1/4 Avi Service Core
    • Tanzu Standard Runtime: 20 cores

    If you need more details about these subscription licenses, please consult the VMware Product Guide (starting from page 37).

    As you can see, a lot of components (I didn’t even list all) form the Tanzu Advanced  edition. The calculation, planning and sizing for the different components require multiple discussions with your Tanzu specialist from VMware.

    8) Tanzu Standard Sizing

    Disclaimer – This sizing is based on my current understanding, and it is always recommended to do a proper sizing with your Tanzu specialists / consultants.

    So, we have learnt before that Tanzu Standard licensing is based on cores, which are “used by the worker and management nodes delivering K8s clusters”.

    As you may already know, the so-called “Supervisor Cluster” is currently formed by three control plane VMs. Looking at the validated design for Tanzu for VMware Cloud Foundation workload domains, one can also get a better understanding of the Tanzu Standard runtime sizing for vSphere-only environments.

    The three Supervisor Cluster (management nodes) VMs have each 4 vCPUs – this means in total 12 vCPUs.

    The three Tanzu Kubernetes Cluster control plane VMs have each 2 vCPUs – this means in total 6 vCPUs.

    The three Tanzu Kubernetes Cluster worker nodes (small size) have each 2 vCPUs – this means in total 6 vCPUs.

    My conclusion here is that you need to license at least 24 vCPU to get started with Tanzu Standard.

    Important Note: The VMware product guide says that “a Core is a single physical computational unit of the Processor which may be presented as one or more vCPUs“. If you are planning a CPU overcommit of 1:2 (cores:vCPU) for your on-premises infrastructure, then you have to license 12 cores only.

    Caution: William Lam wrote about the possibility to deploy single or dual node Supervisor Cluster control plane VMs. It is technically possible to reduce the numbers of control plane VMs, but it is not officially supported by VMware. We need to wait until this feature becomes available in the future.

    It would be very beneficial for customers with a lot of edge locations or smaller locations in general. If you can reduce the Supervisor Cluster down to two control plane VMs only, the initial deployment size would only need 14 vCPUs (cores).

    9) NSX Advanced Load Balancer Sizing and Licensing

    General licensing instructions for Avi aka NSX ALB (Enterprise) can be found here

    NSX ALB is licensed based on cores consumed by the Avi Service Engines. As already said before, you won’t be charged for the Avi Controllers and itt is possible to add new licenses to the ALB Controller at any time. Avi Enterprise licensing is based on so-called Service Cores. This means, one vCPU or core equals one Service Core.

    Avi as a standalone product has only one edition, the fully-featured Enterprise edition. Depending on your needs and the features (LB, GSLB, WAF, analytics, K8s ingress, throughput, SSL TPS etc.) you use, you’ll calculate the necessary amount of Service Cores.

    It is possible to calculate and assign more or less than 1 Service Core per Avi Service Engine:

    • 25 Mbps throughput (bandwidth) = 0.4 Service Cores
    • 200 Mbps throughput = 0.7 Service Cores

    Example: A customer wants to deploy 10 Service Engines with 25MB and 4 Service Engines with 200MB. These numbers would map to 10*0.4 Service Cores + 4*0.7 Services Cores, which give us a total of 6.8 Service Cores. In this case you would by 7 Service Cores. 

    10) Tanzu for Kubernetes Operations (TKO)

    Now it’s time to answer the questions we parked before:

    • What if I want Tanzu Standard (Kubernetes runtime with Tanzu Mission Control and some open- source software) but not the complete feature set of Tanzu Mission Control Advanced?
    • What if I want the complete feature set of NSX ALB Enterprise?
    • What if I still want Tanzu Standard only but would like to have Tanzu Observability as well?

    The answer to this and the questions above is Tanzu for Kubernetes Operations (TKO)!

    Conclusion

    Wherever you are on your application modernization journey, VMware and their Tanzu portfolio got your back covered. Not matter if you want to start small, make your first steps and experiences with open-source projects, or if you want to have a complete set with the Tanzu Advanced edition, VMware offers the right options and flexibility.

    I hope my learnings from this customer engagement help you to better understand the Tanzu portfolio and its capabilities.

    Please leave your comments and thoughts below. 🙂